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Our little guy arrived in a flurry on Thursday morning.

I started having consistent contractions late Wednesday night, but because I had been having them for months, didn’t take them too seriously.

I slept on an off all night, but really didn’t think I was in labor. (I think because I was induced with Adrienne, I didn’t know that contractions could be so manageable when they just happen on their own).

Seven o’clock Wednesday morning I was freezing (there had been a snowstorm overnight) and got in a hot the bath to warm up.

Adrienne got up at seven-thirty, and when I got out of the bath to get her, things started picking up a bit, but I still didn’t think I was going to have a baby anytime soon.

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At eight o’clock I told Meeker he should probably go to work because I was almost positive that nothing would happen until later in the day. He hopped in the shower and started to get ready.

I texted my friend/neighbor and asked if she would come hang out with us in case my labor started to pick up. I told her there was no rush.

Adrienne and I went downstairs to make breakfast, and I thought, hmm, I’ll call my doctor and just see what she says. She told me I should probably go to the hospital (my contractions were about a minute long and about three minutes apart at this point). She called back two minutes later to tell me that the hospital at which I planned to deliver was full, and to go to another.

My daddy called a minute later and I told him that although we were going to the hospital, I didn’t even know if I was actually in labor. I told him I’d call him once we were admitted to the hospital.

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But the next contraction brought me to my knees. And then thirty seconds later, another one hit and I was crawling around on the floor trying find the right buttons on my phone. I texted my neighbor and asked her if she could rush over. I yelled to Meeker that he couldn’t go to work…I needed to go to the hospital. He jumped into action and started scraping all the snow and ice off the car.

Meanwhile, my neighbor walked in and I was crawling around on the floor (getting slammed with contractions every thirty seconds), crying and telling Adrienne how much I loved her. (Adrienne was – in turn – crying because her mama was acting like a lunatic.)

We left the house at exactly 8:20am, and two stop-signs later I told Meeker that I could feel the baby coming. We were about ten minutes from the hospital (without the icy roads) and I was almost positive I was not going to make it.

Meeker whipped his truck into a fire station and ran to the doors to try and get some help. Because of the snowstorm, there was not a single person at the fire station, so he called 911 and they dispatched an ambulance, but began talking him through the process of delivering a baby. (He says just thinking about that moment still makes his stomach hurt).

Thankfully (for everyone involved), they got an ambulance to us just as Meeker was checking to see if the baby was crowning. My sweet husband handed me over to the paramedics in what is probably the most relieved moment of his entire life. (Oh did I tell you that my pants were down around ankles and I was kneeling and bellowing in a snow-covered parking lot at this point? I was, and I did not care at all. I just wanted someone to make the pain stop.)

The ambulance navigated us through the icy streets, Meeker followed in his truck, and I just moaned and pleaded with the EMTs to let me push the baby out as quickly as I could. They kept telling me to hold on…which was impossible, but somehow I did it anyway.)

They wheeled me into the hospital just as my water broke, and a few minutes (and a few screams and pushes later) out came our little man.

Jesse Jack (meaning ‘God exists’ and ‘God is gracious’ – Jack is also my dad’s name).

7 pounds, 1 ounce, 21 inches long.

8:59am. Thirty-nine minutes after we left our house.

Welcome to the world, sweet boy. We could not be more thrilled that you are here (and we’re really glad you didn’t arrive in the back of a dirty old pick-up truck).

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